Mockingbird

Another Sabbath.
From the power line the end-
less mockingbird song.

Which is to say I
pick it up in the middle,
beginning and end

doubled, outpouring
of the festive kenotic
music of being.

Author: Tom D'Evelyn

Tom D'Evelyn is a private editor and writing tutor in Portland OR and, thanks to the web, across the US and in the UK. He can be reached at tom.develyn@comcast.net. D'Evelyn has a PhD in Comparative Literature from UC Berkeley. Before retiring he held positions at The Christian Science Monitor, Harvard University Press, Boston University and Brown University. He ran a literary agency for ten years, publishing books by Leonard Nathan and Arthur Quinn, among others. Before moving to Portland OR he was managing editor at Single Island Press, Portsmouth NH. He blogs at http://tdevelyn.com and other sites.

3 thoughts on “Mockingbird”

  1. The poem sets the reader in motion with liturgical time, the Sabbath, though this is tempered by the quotidien note ‘another’. We are in the middle of things. THe poem moves us to the stark image of human intervention in nature, the power line. Yet as a word, ‘power line’ also may act as a kind of base-line above which others words, humans’ and birds’, rise. THe mockingbird’s song is not exactly a ring composition, something all good compositions and readings challenge in the aha moment of the kairos uplift at the end. Here we are in the middle of the mocking bird’s song. THe outpouring of the mockingbird’s song embodies the openness of song, composition, teh open whole of the composition which critiques the view of ring composition and also theories of no form but simply the flux of images. Form is open and opened adn we are in the middle. It is outpouring, as being is flowing from the infinite source.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s