Outside Providence VII

Clear skies, a light wind.
A couple finally sets
sail in a small boat.

I sailed as a child.
So close to the water, so
far from everything.

Perhaps they feel young
again, not quite themselves, high
on what’s possible.

Author: Tom D'Evelyn

Tom D'Evelyn is a private editor and writing tutor in Cranston RI and, thanks to the web, across the US and in the UK. He can be reached at tom.develyn@comcast.net. D'Evelyn has a PhD in Comparative Literature from UC Berkeley. Before retiring he held positions at The Christian Science Monitor, Harvard University Press, Boston University and Brown University. He ran a literary agency for ten years, publishing books by Leonard Nathan and Arthur Quinn, among others. Before moving to Portland OR he was managing editor at Single Island Press, Portsmouth NH. He blogs at http://tdevelyn.com and other sites.

One thought on “Outside Providence VII”

  1. The immediacy of perception–the ineluctable modality of the visible to echoe Ulysses–animates this poem. YEt this immediacy is categorically different from ‘authenticiyt’ wich we might assume lies at the heart of a couple venturing out together. It is the objective absolute that is also more than itself somehow because or in the way s in which it responds to our interaction–water, wind, sunlight shifting as we steer through them. So the possible is here not so much the impossible range of things tha can be imagined as it is the dazzling diversity of what really is in all the layers of being. So the poem helps the reader see how we as humans blessed by finitude can be filled with the wisdom or time and the vigour of youth –not that age is just a number or timea construct but that they are a gift.

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